Saving the planet (one CD at a time)

For some time now, I have been using the UNetbootin utility to burn ISO files to a USB memory stick instead of making a bootable CD. This makes it easy to (a) try out new Ubuntu distros and erase them when the beta-versions don’t work (which they never do on my development machine), (b) avoid my house sinking to the centre of the earth under the weight of trial software on CD’s, and (c) use the bootable USB memory stick on a netbook – that doesn’t have a CD drive!

Things have always gone swimmingly when using UNetbootin. Just download an ISO file, burn it to a USB memory stick, and then boot the computer from the stick. [Note – Your computer’s BIOS must support booting from the USB for this to work.] But, recently, I have had two failures.

I downloaded both the System Rescue CD and GParted Live, and burnt each of the ISO files to a USB memory stick. In each case, the process completed normally, but the computer refused to boot from either stick. The boot process started and then just hung. No warnings. No errors. Nothing.

For once, I couldn’t find anything useful on Google. But, on checking the installation details on the GParted web site, I found that they seem to prefer Tuxboot over UNetbootin.

Now this is a little weird, since Tuxboot is essentially a variant of UNetbootin. But, for the present, Unetbootin just wasn’t doing the job, so why not give Tuxboot a try?

It was easy enough to do. Download the latest version of Tuxboot which arrived as the file tuxboot-linux-23. Make this file executable (sudo nautilus – right click on the file – select Properties – Permissions – and check “Allow executing file as program”). Double click on the file to run the program. Browse for the Pre-Downloaded ISO file. The target USB memory stick was selected by default. Click on OK and Tuxboot does the rest.

The final step is to reboot the computer (hit F10 to bring up the boot menu in order to select the USB memory stick) and – voilà – GParted running in all its glory.

Another blank CD saved from being written to and, when outdated, saved from being thrown away. The USB memory stick, of course, can readily be recycled by simply overwriting the contents with new data. Another small step to save the planet.

References:

UNetbootin – Homepage and Downloads
http://unetbootin.sourceforge.net/

SystemRescueCd
http://www.sysresccd.org

Gnome Partition Editor
http://gparted.sourceforge.net/

Tuxboot
http://tuxboot.org/

Exploring Linux – Part 15
http://www.opcug.ca/public/Reviews/linux_part15.htm

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One Response to Saving the planet (one CD at a time)

  1. lovetide says:

    I created a bootable SystemRescueCD-2.3.0 USB disk via Unetbootin-win-549.exe, but Unetbootin lost many menu items of SystemRescueCD (items before line #477 of /isolinux/isolinux.cfg are lost). So I added some lost menu items to syslinux.cfg, SystemRescueCD on USB disk works now.
    ——————– what I added to syslinux.cfg —————–
    label rescuecd_std
    menu label SystemRescueCd
    kernel /isolinux/rescuecd
    append initrd=/isolinux/initram.igz scandelay=1

    label rescuecd_791
    menu label SystemRescueCd Framebuffer console in high resolution
    kernel /isolinux/rescuecd
    append initrd=/isolinux/initram.igz scandelay=1 nomodeset vga=791

    label rescuecd_x64_std
    menu label SystemRescueCd (64bit)
    kernel /isolinux/rescue64
    append initrd=/isolinux/initram.igz scandelay=1

    label rescuecd_x64_791
    menu label SystemRescueCd (64bit) Framebuffer console in high resolution
    kernel /isolinux/rescue64
    append initrd=/isolinux/initram.igz scandelay=1 nomodeset vga=791

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